Important: Rest assured, we are committed to ensuring you have continued access to your medicine. Aurora’s production operations and existing supply chain procedures remain active to serve our patients. We are taking the highest safety measures at our facilities and through our distribution networks to continue to deliver your orders to you.
Aurora continues to work closely with our partners, including mail and courier services, to maintain delivery timelines. Changes announced by Canada Post to their services can be found on www.canadapost.ca, we are monitoring developments closely and will update our patients as the circumstance evolves.
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References

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